Crucial Things You Should Never Say to Someone Dealing with Panic Attacks

When someone is having a panic attack, a flood of fear gives the alert of fight-or-flight type of reaction. The heart begins to race as if the person can’t breathe.

While you might want to tell a friend having a panic attack to shake it off, that would be so off-base from multiple points of view.

On the off chance that you truly need to help a friend or family member, these are the insensitive things you should avoid saying:

“Stop it.”

If that the person could stop it, that person would. However, during a fit of anxiety, the body believes it’s in fast approaching danger and needs to figure out how to survive.

At that time, the legitimate mind has closed down and the battle of fight-or-flight focus is in full control. That is the piece of the mind that can’t think the usual way.

 

“You’re fine.”

An outsider may not understand somebody is having a panic attack since the person in question is talented at concealing indications.

 

“Wouldn’t you be able to simply calm down?”

Panic attack come suddenly and can last most recent a few minutes or more, as stated by the National Institute of Mental Health.

An individual who normally gets panic attacks may take adapting skills from an advisor, yet it’s truly difficult to try to stop a fit of anxiety.

 

“Try not to stress over it.”

Giving somebody requests like “Don’t consider it” or “Don’t stress over it” can really increase a panic attack. It is belittling and insensitive.

“Suck it up.”

Advising somebody to “be strong” or “man up” suggests that the individual is powerless or can’t deal with their feelings.

These sorts of cutting comments or different methods for lashing out in anger just complicates and heightens things. Getting yourself stirred up in it will just add to the individual’s terrified emotions.

Inevitably, the person who suffers from panic attacks might actually understand that you’re not useful nor reliable.

 

So, try to recognize that the individual is in trouble, that you care about them, and that you will do whatever you can to support that person in order to have a sense of security. Simply being there is hugely comforting.

 

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